Independence coal  plants are old

The City of Independence owns two of the oldest power plants in Missouri.

Both plants face options about whether to make additional investments in the plants given the costs of upgrading to meet new environmental regulations, other energy alternatives and the overall age of the plants. Both plants recently were listed in a national report as "ripe for replacement."

See where the two city-owned power plants are located.

IP&L has publicly committed to stop burning coal at these two plants by January 2016.

It will convert Blue Valley to natural gas and is exploring options for decommissioning Missouri City.

 

Ripe for Retirement:
An Economic Anaylsis for the U.S. Coal Fleet
 

Missouri City

The City of Independence purchased the small coal-fired Missouri City plant from a rural electric cooperative in 1979.

The acquisition gave the city, which was growing through annexation and post World War II boom, reserve generating capacity to meet demand.

Other records show the Missouri City may be the oldest operating power plant in Missouri.

Missouri City can burn coal or oil.

Missouri City is listed on a recent report as "ripe for retirement" given its age, the cost of coal and lower or alternative energy options.

See a Google map aerial view of Missouri City.

 

Blue Valley

The City of Independence built the Blue Valley plant which became operational in 1958.

The new power plant made the community "energy independent for the next 40 years."

Other records show Blue Valley is one of the older power plants in Missouri.

Blue Valley can burn coal, natural gas or oil.

Blue Valley is listed on a recent report as "ripe for retirement" given its age, the cost of coal and lower or alternative energy options.

Learn more from the IP&L guidebook about the Blue Valley Plant.

See a Google map aerial view of Blue Valley.

 

New Generation Capacity Report Shows Energy Shifts

The American Public Power Association publishes a periodic report showing new electrical generating plants that are under construction, permitted or pending based on fuel type and region.

The February 2014 report notes:

 Click the image to download the report

Click the image to download the report

"The most notable development is the steep decline in coal's share: from a high of over 40 percent in 2009 to just below 3 in 2014. On the other hand, the amount of solar capacity under construction has increased from a fraction of a percent to over ten percent in the latest (2014) report."

Over 70% of proposed new plants involve "zero-emitting" forms of renewable energy - wind, hydro and solar.